Horse slaughter and horse meat production — A global perspective

March 2020

By JANE ALLIN

MARCH AGAINST HORSE SLAUGHTER — A total of 77 countries slaughter horses for their meat. These can be divided into 5 major regions (this data is based on the most recent available FAO numbers published in 2018):

• Africa – 13 countries
• Americas – 15 countries (statistics do not include the US)*
• Asia – 12 countries
• Europe – 33 countries
• Oceania – 4 countries

(*) In 2007, horse slaughter plants in the US were shuttered and remain this way today. Slaughter of US horses has shifted to Mexico and Canada.


Latest stats show a staggering 1.75 billion lbs of horse meat was produced in 2018 from approximately 5 million horses around the globe.


Table 1 shows the global production share of horse meat and horses slaughtered by region with accompanying pie charts indicating the percentage each region contributes to the global total.

Note that 1 tonne equals 2,205 pounds which equates to a total of approximately   1,746,019,229 pounds of horse meat produced around the globe in 2018 from approximately 5 million horses — a staggering 1.75 billion pounds of horse meat.

All of the information that follows is available at: http://www.fao.org/faostat/en/#data/QL

Table 1 — Horse Meat Produced and Number of Horses Slaughtered Worldwide by Region — 2018

Figure 1. Horses slaughtered worldwide by region (% of total)

Figure 2. Horse meat produced worldwide by region (% of total)

Five years later how have things changed?

The last time we looked at these numbers was 2017 when the most recent data available was from 2013. Currently the most recent metrics are from 2018. To demonstrate how things evolved over the 5-year interval, a comparison of data between 2013 and 2018 was evaluated using:

• The % of the total of the horses slaughtered worldwide by region to indicate the regions that represent the highest and lowest number of slaughtered horses.

• The % of the total of horse meat produced worldwide by region to indicate the regions that represent the highest and lowest tonnage of horse meat production.

• The change in thenumber of horses slaughtered worldwide by region to indicate which regions increased or decreased horse slaughter.

• The change in the horse meat produced worldwide by region to indicate which regions increased or decreased horse meat production.

Table 2. Horses slaughtered worldwide by region (% of total): 2018 vs 2013

In 2013 Asia and the Americas accounted for ~79% of all horses slaughtered compared to ~85% in 2018, an increase of ~6% over the 5-year interval.

Figure 3. Horses slaughtered worldwide by region (% of total): 2018 vs 2013

Table 3. Horse meat produced worldwide by region (% of total): 2018 vs 2013

In 2013 Asia and the Americas accounted for ~77% of all horse meat production compared to ~81% in 2018, an increase of ~4% over the 5-year interval.

Figure 4. Horse meat produced worldwide by region (% of total): 2018 vs 2013

Changes by region for number of horses slaughtered and horse meat produced over 5 years are shown in Table 4 and Table 5 respectively.

Table 4 – Change in number of horses slaughtered worldwide by region (head): 2018 vs 2013

Table 5 – Change in horse meat production worldwide by region (tonnes): 2018 vs 2013

Figure 5.  Change (%) in horses slaughtered and horse meat production by region: 2013 to 2018 

Both horse meat production and the number of horses slaughtered in Asia and the Americas increased significantly over a period of 5 years. By contrast, there were significant decreases for both metrics in Europe and Oceania, and little to no change in Africa. Overall both the number of horses slaughtered and horse meat produced globally increased between 2013 and 2018.

SUMMARY

1. Global horse meat production in 2018 was a staggering 1.75 billion pounds taken from the carcasses of approximately 5 million slaughtered horses worldwide.

2. In 2018, Asia was by far the global leader in the number of horses slaughtered (~58% of the total) and horse meat produced (~53% of the total).

3. The Americas are a distant second with approximately half of both horses slaughtered (~27% of the total) and horse meat produced (~27% of the total) compared to Asia.

4. Together, Asia and the Americas were responsible for about 86% of the horses slaughtered and 81% of horse meat produced globally in 2018.

5. From 2013 to 2018, Asia and the Americas significantly increased both the number of horses slaughtered and horse meat produced.

6. The number of horses slaughtered in Asia increased by ~371,000 head (14.5%) and horse meat produced by ~75,700 tonnes (~170,325,000‬ lb), an increase of ~22% over the five-year period from 2013 to 2018.

7. Similarly, although to an even greater extent percentage wise, the number of horses slaughtered in the Americas increased by ~236,650 head (~21%) and horse meat produced by ~42,500 tonnes (~ 93,712,500‬ lb), an increase of ~24%, over the five-year period from 2013 to 2018.

8. By contrast, the number of horses slaughtered and horse meat produced in Europe and Oceania decreased. Most notably, the number of horses slaughtered in Europe decreased by ~24% or ~168,500 head and horse meat production decreased ~25% or ~37,400 tonnes (82,467,000 lb.). Oceania also had a significant decrease in both metrics with a reduction of ~17% in the number of horses slaughtered and 13% in horse meat production.

9. Africa’s numbers remained relatively stable over the five-year interval.

10. Globally both the number of horses slaughtered (9%) and horse meat produced (~11%) increased over the 5-year period due to the large increase in both Asia and the Americas despite reductions elsewhere.


All Reports

Horse slaughter and horse meat production worldwide — Introduction »

Horse slaughter and horse meat production — A global perspective »

Top 10 countries ranked by horses slaughtered and horse meat production — 2018 »

Top 10 importers and exporters of horse meat worldwide »

Canada’s Horse Slaughter Plants and U.S. Ports of Entry »


© Fund for Horses. All Rights Reserved.

Top 10 countries ranked by horses slaughtered and horse meat production (2018)

March 2020

By JANE ALLIN

MARCH AGAINST HORSE SLAUGHTER — Recall from my introductory article in this series that the FAO stats are not always based on original datasets for countries included in their assessments. Missing values are a common problem for international datasets, stemming form countries’ non-responses to the data requests dispatched on a regular basis by international or regional organizations. The FAO Statistics Division has developed innovative methods to improve data reliability and consistency across statistical domains.

As a result, some numbers may not reflect those you see elsewhere, but nonetheless provide a framework for the overall distribution of horse meat production and horse slaughter across the globe. 

One glaring inconsistency is their failure to recognise that horse slaughter has been effectively shuttered in the US since 2007 and has since shifted to Mexico and Canada. For practical purposes, these data have been omitted from this analysis. Consequently, the numbers for Canada and Mexico will likely differ from actual numbers recorded by the respective countries since both were calculated using imputation methodology. 

Also note that these stats include horses slaughtered, and horse meat from all sources, not just Federal slaughterhouses where meat has been cleared (unscrupulously, of course) for human consumption. Please refer to the FAO website for more information on the collection of data and methods used to report it.

See http://fenixservices.fao.org/faostat/static/documents/Q/Q_Revision_Note_e.pdf

Horses Slaughtered (2018)

China tops the list of countries with the greatest number of horses slaughtered in 2018 (1,589,164 head) representing approximately 32% of the total globally.

The top 10 horse slaughterers by country in the world include about 86% (~ 5 million head) of the world’s total as shown in Table 1 and the accompanying bar chart (Figure 1).

Table 1. Top ten countries for horse slaughter and percent of total globally (2018)

(*) Aggregate, may include official, semi-official, estimated or calculated data

(**) Imputation replaces missing data with substituted values using an appropriate imputation methodology. As a result, it may not precisely reflect official data. http://www.fao.org/fileadmin/user_upload/eufao-fsi4dm/doc-training/17_Hoffmeister__Imputations__EN.pdf

See also to the earlier article: “Horse slaughter and horse meat production worldwide — Introduction

Figure 1. Top ten countries for horse slaughter and percent of total globally (2018)

Horse Meat Production (2018)

Again, China comes in number 1 with the largest amount of horse meat produced (200,452 tonnes or 441,996,660 lb.) representing approximately 26% of the total globally.

The top 10 horse meat producers by country in the world include about 83% of the world’s total representative of 762,713 tonnes (~1.7 billion lb.) as shown in Table 2 and the accompanying bar chart (Figure 2).

Table 2. Top ten countries for horse meat production and percent of total globally (2018)

Figure 2. Top ten countries for horse meat production and percent of total globally (2018)

How have things changed since 2013?

The last time we looked at these numbers was 2017 when the most recent data available was from 2013. Currently the most recent metrics are from 2018. To demonstrate how things evolved over the 5-year interval, a comparison of data between 2013 and 2018 was evaluated.

• The % change in horses slaughtered for the top ten horse slaughtering countries globally from 2013 to 2o18.

• The % change in horse meat production for the top ten horse meat producing countries globally from 2013 to 2o18.

Table 3. Top ten countries for horse slaughter and percent of total globally: 2018 vs 2013

Figure 3. % change in horses slaughtered from 2013 to 2018 – Top ten countries

For the top ten countries for horse slaughter, the total number of horses slaughtered increased by about 31% in 2018 compared to 2013 (i.e. 1,173,714 head). The most notable increases were for Kazakhstan (37%), Mongolia (33%), and Kyrgystan (21%). Moderate increases were observed for China and Brazil (6.5) while the other countries had less than a 5% increase, with decreases observed in both Australia (-12%) and Russia (~4%). 

Table 4. Top ten countries for horse meat production and percent of total globally: 2018 vs 2013

Figure 4. % change in horse meat production from 2013 to 2018 – Top ten countries

For the top ten countries for horse meat production, the total tonnes of horse meat produced increased by about 15% in 2018 compared to 2013 (i.e. 85,223 tonnes or approximately 188 million lb.). The most notable increases were for Mongolia (~95%), almost double what they produced in 2013, and Kazakhstan (41.5%). Moderate increases were observed for China (~12%), Kyrgystan (9%) and Brazil (~7%), while the other countries had less than a 5% increase, with decreases observed in both Australia (-12%) and Russia (~7%). 

SUMMARY

(1) China tops the list of countries with the greatest number of horses slaughtered in 2018 (1,589,164 head) representing approximately 32% of the total globally.

(2) The top 10 global horse slaughterers by country include about 86% (~ 5 million head) of the world’s total.

(3) China also comes in number 1 with the largest amount of horse meat produced (200,452 tonnes or 441,996,660 lb.) representing approximately 26% of the total globally.

(4) The top 10 horse global meat producers by country include about 83% of the world’s total representative of 762,713 tonnes (~1.7 billion lb.).

(5) Little has changed from 2013 to 2018 in terms of the ranking of the top ten countries for both horse slaughter and horse meat production. China remains the leading nation for both metrics. 

(6) However, there have been significant changes for several countries as far as the increases or decreases observed for both metrics.

(7) For horse slaughter, the most notable increases between 2013 and 2018 were for Kazakhstan (37%), Mongolia (33%), and Kyrgystan (21%). Moderate increases were observed for China and Brazil (6.5) while decreases were observed for both Australia (-12%) and Russia (~4%). 

(8) For horse meat production, the most significant increases were observed for Mongolia (~95%), almost double what they produced in 2013, and Kazakhstan (41.5%). Moderate increases were observed for China (~12%), Kyrgystan (9%) and Brazil (~7%), while decreases observed in both Australia (-12%) and Russia (~7%). 

(9) For the top ten countries, the total number of horses slaughtered increased by about 31% in 2018 compared to 2013 (i.e. 1,173,714 head). This increase is due to the large increases observed in Kazakhstan, Mongolia and Kyrgystan along with the moderate increase in China. 

(10) The total tonnes of horse meat produced for the top ten producing nations increased by about 15% (i.e. 85,223 tonnes or approximately 188 million lb.). This increase is primarily a result of the increased horse meat production in Mongolia, Kazakhstan and China. 


All Reports

Horse slaughter and horse meat production worldwide — Introduction »

Horse slaughter and horse meat production — A global perspective »

Top 10 countries ranked by horses slaughtered and horse meat production — 2018 »

Top 10 importers and exporters of horse meat worldwide »

Canada’s Horse Slaughter Plants and U.S. Ports of Entry »


© Fund for Horses. All Rights Reserved.

Top 10 importers and exporters of horse meat worldwide

March 2020

By Jane Allin

MARCH AGAINST HORSE SLAUGHTER — Recall from the previous articles in this series, that the FAO stats are not always based on original datasets for countries included in their assessments. The FAO Statistics Division addressed this by developing innovative methods to improve data reliability and consistency across statistical domains.

As a result, the numbers quoted in the last two articles did not always reflect those seen elsewhere, however they provided a framework and a general guideline for the overall distribution of horse meat production and horse slaughter across the globe. 

By contrast, the FAO numbers obtained for the top ten importers and exports of horse meat, apart from China (aggregate numbers based on imputation methods), are the official data from each country and so provide a more accurate picture of the global distribution of imports and exports.

Moreover, the most recent data for these numbers are from 2017, as opposed to 2018 for the horse slaughter and horse meat production.

The data collected will consider the following:

• The top 10 horse meat importers in both quantity (tonnes) and value (1000s of USD) in 2017. Note that the most recent data for these numbers are from 2017, as opposed to 2018 for the horse slaughter and horse meat production

• A comparison of the top ten horse meat importers (quantity and value) between 2017 and 2013 – a 4-year span.  This is to compare what we looked at in 2015 where the most recent data at that time was from 2013.

• The top 10 horse meat exporters in both quantity (tonnes) and value (1000s of USD) in 2017.

• A comparison of the top ten horse meat exporters (quantity and value) between 2017 and 2013 – a 4-year span.  

Top 10 Horse Meat Importers (Quantity in Tonnes)

The top 10 horse meat importing countries in quantity (tonnes) globally (2017) were responsible for about 94% of the world’s total as shown in Table 1 and Figure 1.

This represents 109,254 tonnes or roughly 241 million pounds. China (~20%) and Italy (~19%) were the two highest importers of horse meat.

Table 1.  Horse meat imports (tonnes) and percent of total globally — 2019

Figure 1.  Horse meat imports (tonnes) and percent of total globally — 2017

Changes in Horse Meat Imports from 2013 to 2019 — Top 10 Importing Countries (quantity)

From 2013 to 2017 there was a 7.1% increase in the quantity of horse meat imported for the top 10 importing countries in the world. This amounts to a total of 7,238 tonnes or ~ 16 million lb.

The most notable increase in horse meat imports was observed for China with an incredibly large increase of over 1300% or about 48 million pounds of imported horse meat. Voracious appetites indeed. Imports from the Netherlands’ also reported a large increase of about 170% or about 18 million lb.  Of note is that in 2013 China ranked 12th in the world but moved up to the number 1 spot in 2017. 

Apart from Japan (~23% or ~2 million lb.) and Bulgaria (~14% or ~ 600,000 lb.), which also had increased imports, imports in all other countries, each of which were ranked in the top 10 in 2013, decreased. The largest decreases were observed for Belgium (~ 38% or ~20 million lb.) and Switzerland (~34% or ~ 3 million lb.). 

Overall 4, countries (China, The Netherlands, Japan and Bulgaria) increased imports of horse meat by about 69 million lb. and the remaining 6 decreased imports by about 53 million lb. for a net increase of about 16 million lb. (actual = 7,238 tonnes = 15,959,790).

This is shown in Table 2 and Figure 2.

Table 2. Horse meat imports (tonnes) — comparison of 2013 and 2017

Figure 2. Horse meat imports (tonnes) — comparison of 2013 and 2017

Top 10 Horse Meat Importers (Value in 1000’s of USD)

The top 10 horse meat importing countries in value (1000’s of USD) globally (2017) are responsible for about 95% of the world’s total horse meat value as shown in Table 3 and Figure 3.

This represents 427,612 in 1000’s of USD or roughly 428 million USD. Italy’s import value of about 100 million USD (~22%) is by far the largest of the global total.

Table 3. Horse meat imports (1000’s of USD) and percent of total globally – 2017

Figure 3. Horse meat imports (1000’s of USD) and percent of total globally — 2017

Changes in Horse Meat Imports from 2013 to 2019 – Top 10 Importing Countries (Value)

From 2013 to 2017 there was a 10.3% decrease in the value (1000’s of USD) of horse meat imported for the top 10 importing countries in the world. This amounts to a total of about 39 million USD.

Italy, Belgium and France remained the 3 top countries for the value of horse meat imported, despite all 3 having reduced values in 2017 compared to 2013.

The most notable, increase in the value of horse meat imported to a country was observed for China with a large increase of about 182% or about 47 million USD worth of imported horse meat. The only other countries showing an increase in the value of imported horse meat were the Netherlands (~14%) and Japan (~3%). Of note is that in 2013 China ranked 13th in the world but moved up to the number 5 spot in 2017. 

The value of horse meat imports for all other countries, each of which were ranked in the top 10 in 2013, decreased. The decreases ranged from a high of Kazakhstan (~6% or ~20 million USD) to a low of ~0.6% in Italy (~15 million USD)

Overall 3, countries (China, the Netherlands and Japan) increased the value of horse meat imports by about 85 million USD and the remaining 7 decreased imports by about 124 million USD for a net decrease of ~39 million USD.

This is shown in Table 4 and Figure 4.

Table 4. Horse meat imports (1000’s of USD) — comparison of 2013 and 2017

Figure 4. Horse meat imports (1000’s of USD) – comparison of 2013 and 2017

Top 10 Horse Meat Exporters (Quantity in Tonnes) — 2017

The top 10 horse meat exporting countries in quantity (tonnes) globally (2017) were responsible for about 81% of the world’s total as shown in Table 5 and Figure 5.

This represents 107,465 tonnes or roughly 237 million pounds. Mongolia (~20%) was the largest horse meat exporter followed by Argentina.

Table 5. Horse meat exports (tonnes) and percent of total globally — 2017

Figure 5. Horse meat exports (tonnes) and percent of total globally — 2017

Changes in Horse Meat Exports from 2013 to 2019 – Top 10 Exporting Countries (Quantity)

From 2013 to 2017 there was a 23.7% increase in the quantity of horse meat exported for the top 10 exporting countries in the world. This amounts to a total of 25,507 tonnes or ~ 56 million lb.

The most notable increase in horse meat exports was observed for Mongolia with an incredibly large increase of over 1200% or about 53 million pounds of imported horse meat. Interestingly, Kenya that had no exports in 2013, exported 6,560 tonnes (~14.5 million lb.) in 2017. 

Romania, Uruguay, Spain and Argentina also had increased exports; 74% (~7 million lb.), 33% (~3.4 million lb.), 25% (~3 million lb.) and 6% (~ 2 million lb.) respectively. Of note is that in 2013 Mongolia ranked 12th in the world but moved up to the number 1 spot in 2017, and Kenya ranked 8th after having no exports 4 years before. 

All other countries’ exports of horse meat decreased. The largest decrease was observed for Canada (~58% or ~25 million lb.), while decreases for Belgium, and Poland were: 33% (~14 million lb.), and 26% (~24 million lb.), respectively. 

The following should clear up any questions about the questionable FAO data observed for Canadian horse slaughter increases observed between 2013 and 2018 (see previous article): 

The 58% decrease in the exports from Canada is a clear indication of the quantifiable decrease in horse slaughter that has occurred there over the past few years. Previous data taken from the FAO (see previous article re: horse slaughter and meat production) suggested that slaughter had increased. The reason for this contradiction is the use of the imputation models that are based on past trends and statistics for the horse slaughter and horse meat production (i.e. it is not “always” reliable). The data for the export values is official data and is thus authentic information.

Overall 7, countries increased exports by about 95 million lb. of horse meat and the remaining 3 decreased exports by about 39 million lb. for a net increase of about 56 million lb. (actual = 25,507 tonnes = 56,242,935‬).

This is shown in Table 6 and Figure 6.

Table 6. Horse meat exports (tonnes) — comparison of 2013 and 2017

N/A* – cannot calculate percentage increase (∞)

Figure 6. Horse meat exports (tonnes) – comparison of 2013 and 2017

Top 10 Horse Meat Exporters (Value in 1000’s of USD) — 2017

The top 10 horse meat exporting countries in value (1000’s of USD) globally (2017) were responsible for about 84% of the world’s total horse meat value as shown in Table 7 and Figure 7.

This represents 382,317 in 1000’s of USD or roughly 382 million USD. Belgium’s export value of about 64 million USD (~14%) was the largest of the global total, followed closely by Argentina’s value of about 61 million USD (~13.1%).

Table 7. Horse meat exports (1000’s of USD) and percent of total globally — 2017

Figure 7. Horse meat exports (1000’s of USD) and percent of total globally — 2017

Changes in horse meat imports from 2013 to 2019 – Top 10 importing countries (value)

From 2013 to 2017 there was a small 1.9% increase in the value (1000’s of USD) of horse meat exported for the top 10 exporting countries in the world. This amounts to a total of about 7 million USD.

Belgium remained the top country for the value of horse meat exported, despite having reduced values in 2017 compared to 2013 by about 29%.

The most notable increase in the value of horse meat exported to a country was observed for Mongolia with an exceptionally large increase of about 12oo% or ~38 million USD worth of exported horse meat. Other significant increases were observed for the Netherlands (~78%), Romania (~48%), Spain (~45%) and Uruguay (~29%). Mongolia moved from 15th in rank (2013) to 3rd, while the other countries remained in the top ten with some changes in their position. 

The value of horse meat exports for all other countries decreased. The decreases ranged from a high in Canada (~47% or ~37 million USD) to a low of ~14% in Poland (~6 million USD)

Overall 6 countries increased the value of horse meat exports by about 82 million USD and the remaining 4 decreased exports by about 75 million USD for a net decrease of ~7 million USD (actual = 6,967 million USD).

This is shown in Table 8 and Figure 8. 

Table 8. Horse meat exports (1000’s of USD) – comparison of 2013 and 2017

Figure 8. Horse meat exports (1000’s of USD) — comparison of 2013 and 2017

SUMMARY

Imports

• The top 10 horse meat importing countries in quantity (tonnes) globally in 2017 were responsible for about 94% of the world’s total.

• This represents 109,254 tonnes or roughly 241 million pounds. China (~20%) and Italy (~19%) were the two highest importers of horse meat.

• From 2013 to 2017 there was a 7.1% increase in the quantity of horse meat imported for the top 10 importing countries in the world. This amounts to a total of 7,238 tonnes or ~ 16 million lb. 

• The most notable increase in horse meat imports was observed for China with a very large increase of over 1300% or about 48 million pounds of imported horse meat. In 2013 China ranked 12th in the world but moved up to the number 1 spot in 2017. 

• Overall 4, countries increased imports of horse meat by about 69 million lb. and the remaining 6 decreased imports by about 53 million lb. for a net increase of about 16 million lb. 

• The top 10 horse meat importing countries in value (1000’s of USD) globally in 2017 were responsible for about 95% of the world’s total horse meat value. This represents 427,612 in 1000’s of USD or roughly 428 million USD. 

• Italy’s import value of about 100 million USD (~22%) was by far the largest of the global total.

Exports

• The top 10 horse meat exporting countries in quantity (tonnes) globally in 2017 were responsible for about 81% of the world’s total. This represents 107,465 tonnes or roughly 237 million pounds. 

• Mongolia (~20%) was the largest horse meat exporter followed by Argentina.

• From 2013 to 2017 there was a 23.7% increase in the quantity of horse meat exported for the top 10 exporting countries in the world. This amounts to a total of 25,507 tonnes or ~ 56 million lb.

• The most notable increase in horse meat exports was observed for Mongolia with an incredibly large increase of over 1200% or about 53 million pounds of imported horse meat. Interestingly, Kenya that had no exports in 2013, exported 6,560 tonnes (~14.5 million lb.) in 2017. 

• Overall 7, countries increased exports in 2017 by about 95 million lb. of horse meat and the remaining 3 decreased exports by about 39 million lb. for a net increase of about 56 million lb. 

• Belgium remained the top country for the value of horse meat exported, despite having reduced values in 2017 compared to 2013 by about 29%.

• The top 10 horse meat exporting countries in value (1000’s of USD) globally in 2017 were responsible for about 84% of the world’s total horse meat value. This represents 382,317 in 1000’s of USD or roughly 382 million USD. 

• Belgium’s export value of about 64 million USD (~14%) was the largest of the global total, closely followed by Argentina’s value of about 61 million USD (~13.1%).

• From 2013 to 2017 there was a small 1.9% increase in the value (1000’s of USD) of horse meat exported for the top 10 exporting countries in the world. 

• The most significant increase in the value of horse meat exported to a country was observed for Mongolia with a very large increase of about 12oo% or ~38 million USD worth of exported horse meat.

• Overall 6, countries increased the value of horse meat exports by about 82 million USD and the remaining 4 decreased exports by about 75 million USD for a net decrease of ~7 million USD.


All Reports

Horse slaughter and horse meat production worldwide — Introduction »

Horse slaughter and horse meat production — A global perspective »

Top 10 countries ranked by horses slaughtered and horse meat production — 2018 »

Top 10 importers and exporters of horse meat worldwide »

Canada’s Horse Slaughter Plants and U.S. Ports of Entry »


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© Fund for Horses. All Rights Reserved.

Canada’s horse slaughter plants and US ports of entry

March 2020

By JANE ALLIN

Horse Slaughter Plants — Canada

MARCH AGAINST HORSE SLAUGHTER

Three slaughterhouses are federally licensed to slaughter horses in Canada:

(1) Viande Richelieu Inc. in Massueville, Que.; Reg No 076; 
https://www.vianderichelieu.com/ 

(2) Les Viandes de la Petite-Nation in St-Andre- Avellin, Que.; [517 Rang Sainte Julie E, Saint-André-Avellin, QC J0V 1W0]; Reg No 505; (no website)

(3) Bouvry Export Calgary Ltd. in Fort MacLeod, Alta.; Reg No 506;
https://www.bouvrycanada.ca/ 

Please Note: Confirmed. Canadian Premium Meats Inc. in Lacombe, Alta. is no longer in operation.

Canada — US Ports of Entry

Here are the only designated ports of entry for slaughter-bound horses:

Canadian Food Inspection Agency Port of Entry:Corresponding US Port of Entry
Kingsgate, British Columbia
250-417-2293
Eastport, Idaho
208-267-2396
Coutts, Alberta
403-344-3808
Sweetgrass, Montana
406-335-9610
North Portal, Saskatchewan
306-927-2255
Portal, North Dakota
701-926-4281
Sarnia (Point Edward), Ontario
519-332-3031
Port Huron, Michigan
517-324-5298
Windsor, Ontario
519-969-2522
Detroit, Michigan
313-226-4428
Niagara Falls (Queenston), Ontario
905-937-7434
Lewiston, New York
716-297-6203
Saint-Bernard-de-Lacolle, Quebec
450-246-4125
Champlain, New York
518-298-2191
Woodstock, New Brunswick
506-325-1960
Houlton, Maine
207-532-6099
Source: https://www.inspection.gc.ca/animal-health/humane-transport/horses/designated-border-ports/eng/1324090361423/1324310392596

All Reports

Horse slaughter and horse meat production worldwide — Introduction »

Horse slaughter and horse meat production — A global perspective »

Top 10 countries ranked by horses slaughtered and horse meat production — 2018 »

Top 10 importers and exporters of horse meat worldwide »

Canada’s Horse Slaughter Plants and U.S. Ports of Entry »


Fund for Horses Logo. ©The Horse Fund.

Horse Slaughter Legislative Timeline

Detailed history of State and Federal attempts to ban the slaughter of U.S. horses for human consumption. Linked by year. It all began in California in 1998 . . .

YEARSSESSION OF CONGRESS
1998  2002 Includes 107th U.S. Congress
2003 — 2004 Includes 108th U.S. Congress
2005 — 2006 Includes 109th U.S. Congress
2007 — 2008Includes 110th U.S. Congress
2009 — 2010 Includes 111th U.S. Congress
2011 — 2012 Includes 112th U.S. Congress
2013 — 2014 Includes 113th U.S. Congress
2015 — 2016Includes 114th U.S. Congress
2017 — 2018Includes 115th U.S. Congress
2019 — 2020Includes 116th U.S. Congress
Compiled by Vivian Grant and Jane Allin

Last updated January 10, 2020

AVMA — Horse slaughter exports to Mexico decrease

Published on February 26, 2020

Last year, 53,947 horses were shipped from the United States to Mexico for slaughter. That marks a 26% decrease from 2018 when 70,708 horses designated for slaughter were transported across the southern U.S. border, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Market News Livestock Export Summary.

Although Congress had made several attempts to ban the slaughter of horses for human consumption, the practice didn’t end until the nation’s three horse meat processing plants closed in 2007. Two Texas facilities were closed by court order; the Illinois plant shuttered after state legislation against horse slaughter was enacted.

Efforts to open new horse slaughter plants have been unsuccessful, partly because of legislation denying funds for federal inspections of such operations.

Nevertheless, thousands of U.S. horses have been exported to slaughterhouses in Mexico and Canada.

Canada and Mexico are two of the main exporters of horse meat to Europe, according to Humane Society International. At least 85% of horses slaughtered at European Union–approved Canadian horse slaughterhouses originated in the United States, and 50% of the horse meat produced from those animals was exported to the EU.

Federal data on the number of horses transported to Canada annually aren’t available. However, the advocacy organization Animals’ Angels estimated that 12,273 U.S. horses were imported by Canada for slaughter in 2017.

California, Illinois, New Jersey, Texas, and New York have enacted laws against horse slaughter and eating horse meat.

Related Reading

US horse slaughter exports to Mexico increase 312%“, JAVMA NEWS, 14 Jan 2008

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