Horse Slaughter Legislative Timeline 2013

“If horses are worth money alive why can’t they be worth money dead?”
— Rep. Skye McNiel, Oklahoma


State and Federal Legislation
113th U.S. Congress (2013—2014)

DATE VENUE ACTIVITY RESULT
February 5, 2013 New Mexico House of Representatives HJM 16, introduced by Rep. Paul C. Bandy (R-Aztec), a bill that would have authorized the State Department of Agriculture to study the feasibility of a slaughter facility to process horse meat for human consumption was considered. Rejected – 36 “no” votes, 28 “yes” votes.
March 12, 2013 US House; US Senate U.S. Congressman Pat Meehan (R-Pa.) and U.S. Sen. Mary Landrieu (D-La.) introduced the Safeguard American Food Exports Act of 2013 — H.R. 1094 and S. 541 on March 12. This legislation, known as the “SAFE Act,” takes a different path on the issue of horse slaughter.

If successful, it would amend the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act to prohibit the sale, transport, import or export of equines, or their parts, to be slaughtered for human consumption.

If passed, this measure would impose fines and prison time for anyone who sells, transports, imports or exports horses going with the intent of slaughtering horses for human consumption.

Anti horse slaughter legislation introduced both chambers.

HR 1094 referred to the Committee on Energy and Commerce, and in addition to the Committee on Agriculture, for a period to be subsequently determined by the Speaker; S 541 referred to the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions.

March 15, 2013 US House HR 1094, the SAFE Act referred to Subcommittee on Health. Burying this bill in Committees.
March 29, 2013 Oklahoma Oklahoma’s 50-year-old ban on horse slaughtering was lifted Friday when Governor Mary Fallin signed a new law that will allow facilities to slaughter horses and process their meat or export. This bill, which takes effect Nov. 1, strictly prohibits selling horse meat for human consumption in Oklahoma.

House Bill 1999 was introduced by Rep. Skye McNiel (R-Bristow) and sponsored in the Senate by Sen. Eddie Fields. The Bill passed 82-14 in the House and 32-14 in the Senate.

McNiel’s family owns the largest slaughter house in Oklahoma. McNiel did not file for re-election in 2014.

Paper victory for horse slaughter proponents.

USDA is refusing to pay for necessary inspections even though no longer blocked by law.

April 2, 2013 US House HR 1094 the SAFE Act, referred to Subcommittee on Livestock, Rural Development, and Credit
April 10, 2013 US Congress Budget proposal released that would again prohibit federal funding of horse meat inspections.

It states: EC. 725. None of the funds made available in this Act may be used to pay the salaries or expenses of personnel to-(1) inspect horses under section 3 of the Federal Meat Inspection Act (21 U.S.C. 603); (2) inspect horses under section 903 of the Federal Agriculture Improvement and Reform Act of 1996 (7 U.S.C. 1901 note; Public Law 104127); or (3) implement or enforce section 352.19 of title 9, Code of Federal Regulations.

The new defunding language contains not only defunding, but also a stipulation that funding not be restored until and unless the Food and Drug Administration makes a determination that meat from American horses can be made safe to enter the food supply.

Until passed by Congress, technically funding to inspect horse meat is available to horse slaughter facilities in States where there are no laws prohibiting the slaughter of horses.
April 15, 2013 New York State Legislature Senate Bill S.4615 / Assembly Bill A.3905 “to amend the Agriculture and Markets Law by adding a new section 380, to prohibit the slaughtering of horses for human consumption” was introduced in the Senate by Kathleen A. Marchione (R,C-Halfmoon) and co-sponsored by Assemblyman Jim Tedisco (R,C,I-Glenville), and prime-sponsored by Assemblywoman Deborah Glick (D-Manhattan), in the Assembly. The sale or purchase of horse meat would also be prohibited. Referred to Agriculture Committee
June 28, 2013 Washington DC USDA grants permit for a southeastern New Mexico company’s (Valley Meat Co.) to convert its cattle facility into a horse slaughter plant. Paper Victory.
July 2, 2013 Washington DC USDA issues a “grant of inspection” to Responsible Transportation, of Sigourney, in southeastern Iowa, because it met all federal requirements. USDA will also be obliged to assign meat inspectors to the plant.

“The Administration has requested Congress to reinstate the ban on horse slaughter,” the USDA said in a statement. “Until Congress acts, the department must continue to comply with current law.”

Paper Victory.
July 2, 2013 Washington DC The Humane Society of the United States, Front Range Equine Rescue, Marin Humane Society, Horses for Life Foundation, Return to Freedom and five private individuals sue under the National Environmental Protection Act, due to the agency’s failure to conduct the necessary environmental review before authorizing horse slaughterhouses to operate. Horse slaughter inspections in the U.S. are delayed for weeks due to The HSUS and Front Range Equine Rescue’s legal action.
August 2, 2013 U.S. District Court of New Mexico Judge Christina Armijo grants a 30-day temporary restraining order preventing the commencement of horse slaughter at two plants—Valley Meat Co. LLC in Roswell, New Mexico and Responsible Transportation in Sigourney, Iowa. Horse slaughter put on hold temporarily while lawsuit continues.
November 1, 2013 U.S. District Court of New Mexico U.S. District Judge Christina Armijo denies the plaintiffs’ (HSUS) request for permanent injunction and dismissed the lawsuit with prejudice. Additionally, since the temporary injunction previously issued by the court expired, horse slaughter operations many commence at the plants issued permits. The Humane Society of the United States, et al, appeals the case to the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals, and moves for a temporary stay of Judge Armijo’s Memorandum Opinion and Order.
November 4, 2013 10th Circuit Court of Appeals The 10th Circuit Court of Appeals temporarily stays District Judge Armijo’s Memorandum Opinion and Order to allow the Court “adequate time to consider the matter”. Until the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals acts, the horse slaughter plants currently holding permits cannot commence operations.
December 13, 2013 10th Circuit Court of Appeals 10th Circuit Court of Appeals denies an emergency Motion for Injunction pending appeal filed by the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) and other animal rights groups. The Motion sought to halt horse slaughter operations at three U.S. plants pending the final resolution of the animal rights groups’ appeal. Horse slaughter operations may now commence under the trial court’s decision, even though the merits of that decision are currently being considered by the 10th Circuit.
December 19, 2013 1st Judicial District Court, Santa Fe NM State Attorney General Gary King sues the Valley Meat horse slaughter plant in Roswell to prevent its expected opening in January. Pending.

Contributors: Vivian Farrell; Jane Allin

©The Horse Fund 2019 Logo in Orange.

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Horse Slaughter Legislative Timeline 2012

State and Federal Legislation
112th U.S. Congress (2011—2012)

DATE VENUE ACTIVITY RESULT
January 23, 2012 US SUPREME COURT Decision handed down on government oversight regarding horse slaughter. States may enact laws banning the slaughter of horses but cannot govern how animals are processed and handled at federally-regulated slaughterhouses. If the processing of horse meat for human consumption is to be resumed in any State where it is still legal under State law, FMIA (Federal Meat Inspection Act) regulations (and not any regulations that the States may attempt to promulgate) will govern how horses are handled and processed in those States. See article by Alison Rowe, specialist in Equine Law.
March 3, 2012 Oregon Following the enactment the new fiscal year’s Department of Agriculture Appropriations bill – that included the successful removal of historic language banning horse meat inspections necessary for its export for human consumption – the United Horsemen’s group makes plans to open horse slaughter facility in Hermiston, Oregon. Community of Hermiston takes aggressive stand against the proposition.
May 24, 2012 New Jersey State Assembly A-2023 passes the NJ State Assembly by a vote of 72-3. The Bill was originally sponsored by Assemblyman Ronald Dancer (R-12). The Bill which prohibits the in-state slaughter of horses, transportation of horses to slaughter and the sale of horse meat for human consumption in New Jersey, moves forward.
June 15, 2012 US Congress — Appropriations Committee The Moran Amendment to the 2013 Agricultural Appropriations Bill — introduced by Rep. Jim Moran (D-Va) earlier this month to block funding to the USDA for horse slaughter facility inspections — survives the passing of the full Appropriations Committee intact. Moves to the US House and Senate for a vote.
June 19, 2012 US House, US Senate The Moran Amendment to the 2013 Agricultural Appropriations Bill passes the US House and Senate. The Amendment blocks federal funding for USDA inspections necessary to slaughter horses and export their meat. Moran’s amendment reinstates the five-year ban on horse slaughter on US soil from 2006-2011. Sent to the President for signing into law.
June 25, 2012 New Jersey State Legislature Senate bill S 1976, sponsored by Senator Raymond J. Lesniak (D-20), was substituted by A2023, the identical bill that already passed State Assembly (See May 24, 2012). The Bill passed the NJ State Senate 35-4. The Bill which prohibits the in-state slaughter of horses, transportation of horses to slaughter and the sale of horse meat for human consumption in the State of New Jersey, moves on to its final stop at Gov. Christie’s desk for signing into law.
July 10, 2012 Texas State Legislature – The Texas State Senate Committee on Agricultural and Rural Affairs met to hear testimony on the economic impact of the closure of Texas horse slaughter plants. Some believe that a repeal of Chapter 149 could be on the table next legislative session. Unless Chapter 149 is repealed or revised, horse slaughter remains illegal in Texas — though it can ostensibly be carried out in other US jurisdictions barring the passage of any federal law that directly or indirectly prohibits it.
August 2012 New Mexico, Missouri, Oregon, Montana, North Dakota, Wyoming Since last year, new horse slaughterhouses have been proposed in New Mexico, Missouri and Oregon, and laws that would permit them to be built more easily have been proposed in Montana, North Dakota and Wyoming. Potential return of horse slaughter on US soil
September 21, 2012 New Jersey Governor’s Office Governor Chris Christie signs anti horse slaughter bill A-2023 into law. The bill passed the State Assembly and Senate in May and June respectively. Success. The in-state slaughter of horses, transportation of horses to slaughter and the sale of horse meat for human consumption in the State of New Jersey.
December 2012 USDA Food Safety and Inspection Services (FSIS) Nature Valley Meats in New Mexico sues USDA over a lack of action on a request for inspections that would clear the way for the company to resume domestic horse slaughterhouse operations.

Rick de los Santos, owner of Valley Meat Co. in Roswell, NM also files a defamation lawsuit against the Humane Society of the United States, Front Range Equine Rescue, and Animal Protection of New Mexico.

Pending.
December 2012 US Senate American Horse Slaughter Prevention Act of 2011 (S. 1176) Ends with 26 Co-Sponsors. Originally introduced 6/9/2011. Referred to Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee. No other activity. Dies in Committee.
December 2012 US House American Horse Slaughter Prevention Act of 2011 (HR 2966) Ends 165 Co-Sponsors. Originally introduced 9/19/2011. Referred to Agriculture Committee. Referred to Energy and Commerce Committee, who subsequently referred it to the Subcommittee on Livestock, Dairy, and Poultry 10/4/2011. No other activity. Dies in Committee.

Contributors: Jane Allin, Vivian Farrell

©The Horse Fund 2019 Logo in Orange.

Horse Slaughter Legislative Timeline 2011

State and Federal Legislation
112th U.S. Congress (2011—2012)

DATE VENUE ACTIVITY RESULT
January 2011 Legislative Assembly of N. Dakota Jan 10: HB 1244, a bill allowing horses to be slaughtered for food with other animals and amending rules governing preparation of equine carcasses, introduced by Rep. M. Nelson. Referred to Ag Cmte.
Jan 27: Passed Ag Cmte (12-0-2), placed on Calendar
Jan 31: Passed House (90 Ayes, 0 Nays)
N. Dakota pro horse slaughter bill introduced, passes House and sent to Senate for action.
January 2011 Nebraska Unicameral Legislature Jan 12: LB 305, a bill to establish state meat inspection program for horses (and other animals), introduced by Tyson Larson
Jan 14: Referred to Ag Cmte
Jan 24: Notice of Hearing for Feb 8th
Nebraska pro horse slaughter Bill introduced. Set for Hearing Feb. 8th.
January 2011 187th General Court of Massachusetts Jan. 18: Bill S00655 banning the slaughter, procurement and transport of horses for human consumption introduced by State Sen. Stephen Brewer.
Jan. 24: Referred to Joint Committee on the Judiciary; House concurs.
Massachusetts anti horse slaughter Bill introduced.
January 2011 New York State General Assembly Jan. 25: A03504, a bill banning horse slaughter and transport for slaughter for human consumption introduced by Assemblywoman Deborah Glick. Referred to Ag Cmte. New York State anti horse slaughter Bill re-introduced. A. Glick introduced this in 2004 and 2009. In each instance the bills were stalled and killed in Cmte by its Chairman MaGee, a “meat industry” politician.
February 2011 Legislative Assembly of N. Dakota Feb 1: Senate receives HB 1244 (see Jan 10, 27 and 31 entries for details).
Feb 21: 1st reading; referred to Ag Cmte. Cmte Hearing set for March 3rd.
N. Dakota pro horse slaughter Bill progresses to Senate; Ag Cmte Hrng set Mar. 3rd.
February 2011 Nebraska Unicameral Legislatue Feb 8: LB 305, Statement of Intent entered, “This bill directs the Department of Agriculture to develop and implement a state meat and poultry inspection agency to inspect meat and meat products for human consumption in compliance with federal regulations by January 1, 2013.”
Feb 23: LB 305 Placed on General File.
Nebraska pro horse slaughter Bill progresses.
May 2011 U.S. House of Representatives May 30: The 2012 Agriculture Budget Bill is debated in the House Appropriations Committee, from which the measure defunding USDA inspections necessary to market horse meat was ripped out, paving the way for the return of horse slaughter to U.S. soil. See below.
May 2011 U.S. House of Representatives May 30: Rep. Jim Moran (D-VA) offers an amendment to continue denying funding for the USDA inspections required to market horse meat. The 2012 Agriculture Budget Bill is voted on in the House Appropriations Committee, passing by a margin of 24-21, with the Moran Amendment intact. The bill is sent to the full House for consideration.
June 2011 U.S. Senate Jun 9, 2011: A bill entitled the American Horse Slaughter Prevention Act of 2011 — S. 1176 — is introduced (pdf) in the United States Senate, Thursday, June 9, 2011, by Senator Mary Landrieu (D-LA) and Senator Lindsey Graham (R-SC) with 14 originating co-sponsors.

S. 1176 amends the Horse Protection Act, making it illegal to transport horses for the purposes of slaughter, among other provisions.

S. 1176 is referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation
September 2011 U.S. Senate Sep. 9, 2011: The Senate Appropriations Committee approve a version of the U.S. Agriculture Appropriations Bill that no longer contains the ban on funding for horse meat inspections.

Sen. Roy Blunt of Missouri and two colleagues with close ties to the beef industry, namely Rep. Jack Kingston of Georgia and Sen. Herb Kohl of Wisconsin, in a secretive back door manouver altered the 2012 omnibus spending bill so it no longer banned funding for horse meat inspections.

If signed into law, this opens the possibility for return of horse slaughter to U.S. soil.
September 2011 US House of Representatives Sept 19: HR 2966 — The American Horse Slaughter Prevention Act of 2011 — introduced by Rep. Dan Burton [R-IN-5]. Assigned to the Energy & Commerce and Agriculture Committees. Last Action: 10/04/2011 Referred to the Subcommittee on Livestock, Dairy, and Poultry. Died in Committee. It had 165 Co-Sponsors.
November 2011 U.S. Congress Nov. 17, 2011: The Agriculture Appropriations Bill for 2012 [October 1, 2011 through September 30, 2012] was passed by Congress and signed into law without the wording that prohibited horse meat inspections since 2006. This potentially flings the door wide open for the return of horse slaughter to U.S. soil. horse slaughter. [1] [2]

 

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FOOTNOTES

[1] Horse Slaughter Prevention Bills and Issues (pdf), by Tadlock Cowan, Congressional Research Service; June 28, 2013.

USDA stated that, although the limitation on FSIS inspection had been lifted, there were still significant regulatory obstacles to resurrecting horse slaughter in the United States. For example, any processing facility has to obtain a federal grant of inspection, conduct a hazard analysis, and develop a Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) plan prior to the processing of any horses for human consumption. A facility in New Mexico—Valley Meats, Inc.—was granted a permit by USDA on June 28, 2013, to begin horse slaughter. USDA has stated that it would grant similar operating permits to plants in Iowa and Missouri in early July 2013. The New Mexico plant had sued USDA in February 2013, accusing it of intentionally delaying the approval process. Both the House (H.R. 2410) and Senate (S. 1244) 2014 Agriculture appropriations bills would again prohibit FSIS from inspecting horses under the Federal Meat Inspection Act. The Administration and USDA have also requested that the ban on horse slaughter continue. As discussed above, the provision had been included in Agriculture appropriations bills since 2008.

[2] Setting the Record Straight on Congress’ Lifting of the Ban on Horse Slaughter. Posted on the USDA blog by Phil Derfler, Deputy Administrator for Food Safety and Inspection Service, December 9, 2011.

There has been a lot of talk in the past week about Congress’ lifting of the ban prohibiting federal funding for the inspection of horses, which prevented the slaughter of horses for human consumption for the past five years.  The issue is understandably a sensitive and emotional one for everyone who loves these majestic animals, but it is important that the discussion be tempered with the facts.

While Congress has technically lifted the ban, horse processing will not resume anytime in the near term.  Under the Federal Meat Inspection Act, horses are an amenable species, which means that horse meat cannot be shipped or sold for human consumption without inspection.

To date, there have been no requests that the Department initiate the authorization process for any horse processing operation in the United States.  In the two states where horse processing took place prior to the Congressional ban, Illinois and Texas,  there are laws in place prohibiting the slaughter of horses.  Even if these laws were changed, any processing facility will still need to satisfy a significant number of requirements, such as obtaining  a federal grant of inspection, conducting a hazard analysis, and developing a Hazard Analysis & Critical Control Points (HACCP) plan prior to the processing of any animals.

—————
Contributors: Jane Allin, Vivian Farrell

Horse Slaughter Legislative Timeline 2010

State and Federal Legislation
111th U.S. Congress (2009—2010)

DATE VENUE ACTIVITY RESULT
January 2010 Missouri Jim Viebrock, R-Republic, sponsors H.B. 1747, aimed at bypassing a federal ban on meat inspectors working in horse slaughtering plants by getting processors to pay for the inspections. Inconclusive.
January 2010 South Dakota Jan 14: H.C.R No. 1003 — SD State House of Representatives urges U.S. Congress and the USDA to reinstate and fully fund USDA’s inspection program for horse euthanasia and horse slaughter facilities. H.C.R. 1003 passes Jan. 22, 2010.
January 2010 Canada – EU Canada to comply with tight new regulations imposed by the EU requiring documentation of medications received by horses bound for slaughter. Aimed at eliminating toxic horsemeat consumed in European countries. Effective 31 July, 2010.
February 2010 California Feb 10: Bill SJR is introduced to memorialize Congress to support federal legislation to protect American horses from slaughter for human consumption. Success.
February 2010 Idaho Feb 15: S.J.M 104 is introduced to the senate urging Congress to oppose federal legislation that interferes with a state’s ability to direct the transport or processing of horses. Idaho joins other states opposing federal bill H.R. 503.
March 2010 South Dakota March 02: South Dakota passes Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 4 (S.C.R 4) urging the reinstatement and funding of federal inspection programs governing equine slaughter and processing facilities. Resolution also urges Congress to defeat HR503/SB 727. Inconclusive.
March 2010 Minnesota Mar 08: Bill SF0133, urging Congress to oppose federal legislation interfering with a state’s ability to direct the transport or processing of horses passed by Committee and goes into second reading Minnesota joins other states opposing federal bill H.R. 503.
March 2010 Wyoming Mar 09: Wyoming Gov. Freudenthal signs H.B. 122 into law. Sponsored by Sue “Slaughterhouse” Wallis, the law allows State livestock authorities to slaughter abandoned horses and sell their meat to prisons and other State institutions. The slaughter of horses becomes legal in Wyoming.
March 2010 Illinois Mar 11: State Representative Jim Sacia (R – Freeport) pulls bill H.B. 583 to legalize horse slaughter from the agenda for this legislative session due to lack of support. No support to return horse slaughter to Illinois.
March 2010 Idaho Mar 18: S.B 1316, sponsored by Rep.Carlos Bilbao And Rep. Tom Trail passes in the House. This new law exempts the slaughter of horses from animal cruelty laws. Voted 59-1 in favor.
April 2010 Missouri Apr 01: Missouri House passes H.B. 1747 (now S.B. 795), sponsored by Rep. Jim Viebrock, designed to allow the slaughter of horses for human consumption. Voted 91-61 in favor.
April 2010 111th Congress 2nd Session April 02: The Prevention of Equine Cruelty Act is re-introduced in the House as H.R. 503 by Reps. John Conyers (D-MI) and Dan Burton (R-IN). Senate version introduced by Sen. Mary Landrieu (D-LA) as S.B. 727. See December 2010.
April 2010 Tennessee Apr 07: After stalling in 2009, State Rep. Frank S. Niceley’s pro-horse slaughter bill, H.B. 1428 as amended, (S.B. 1898 in the Tennessee Senate) is once again advancing in the legislature. The bill as amended would establish a program for the “licensure, licensure renewal, permitting, inspection, and regulation of equine slaughter and processing facilities in Tennessee.”
April 2010 Kentucky Apr 14: Gov. Steve Beshear signs H.B. 398 into law. The fast tracked new law creates a board named for the openly pro-horse slaughter organization, Equine Health and Welfare Alliance.
April 2010 Tennessee Apr 27: H.B. 1428 withdrawn by Niceley following a hearing before the full House Finance, Ways and Means. This type of legislation is dead for the current session.
May 2010 Missouri May 05: HB 1747, a bill that would establish horse slaughter plant operations and meat inspection regulations was tabled in a Senate committee. However, language from that bill was later incorporated into SB 795, an omnibus agriculture bill. Members of a joint House and Senate Conference Committee later stripped the horse processing language from that bill. See Missouri, May 10th.
May 2010 Tennessee May 06: Tennessee Speaker Kent Williams makes the motion to send H.B.1428 to summer study in Finance, Ways and Means. To be determined.
May 2010 Colorado May 07: Colorado House of Representatives approves S.B. 139 allowing taxpayers to donate a portion of their tax dollars to the pro-slaughter Colorado Unwanted Horse Alliance. Voted 42-23 in favor.
May 2010 Missouri May 10: The pro-horse slaughter provisions from Missouri H.B. 1747, which were sneakily buried in an unrelated bill (S.B. 795) found NOT withdrawn or removed by amendment on May 5 as previously reported. Sen. Dan Clemens said there would be no further legislative progress on H.B. 1747.
May 2010 Missouri May 14: Missouri’s 2010 legislative session ends with H.B. 1747 still in the Senate Agriculture Committee—meaning that the bill is dead. Pro-horse slaughter provisions from the bill, buried in S.B. 795, are removed by conference committee. Horse slaughter legislation is off the table.
May 2010 Florida May 14: H.B. 765 is signed into law by Gov. Charlie Crist. HB 765 prohibits the mutilation or killing of any horse, and forbids the transport, distribution, sale, and purchase of horsemeat for human consumption. Violators face felony mandatory minimum penalties of $3,500 in fines and one year in prison, and maximum penalties of five years in prison and $5,000 in fines for each offense. The new law responds directly to a series of horse poaching incidents in south Florida, where the butchered remains of more than 22 horses were discovered in Miami-Dade and Broward counties last year.

NOTE: This new law however does not apply to the slaughter of horses for human consumption in a licensed slaughterhouse. Neither does it bar the sale of horse meat if it is properly packaged, labeled etc as set forth in the new law. Please see West’s F. S. A. § 500.451 (Summary).

May 2010 Colorado May 28: The Colorado state senate concurred in House amendments to S.B. 139, and Gov. Bill Ritter has signed it into law. The bill would allow taxpayers to check on their tax return that a portion of their tax dollars should go to the Colorado Unwanted Horse Alliance, a pro-slaughter organization. Signed into law.
May 2010 Kentucky H.C.R. 347 – opposing H.R. 503 /S 727 – introduced by Rep. Johnny Bell, fails to pass this session. Success.
June 2010 Canada – B.C. Jun 16: Member of Parliament (MP) Alex Atamanenko tables [introduces] Bill C-544 which would amend the Canadian Health of Animals Act and the Meat inspection Act to prohibit the importation or exportation of (a) horses for slaughter for human consumption and; (b) horse meat products for human consumption. First ever legislation banning horse slaughter is introduced in Canada.
July 2010 111th Congress 2nd Session Jul 28: The House of Representatives Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure passes H.R. 305 by voice vote. Introduced at the start of the 111th Congress. H.R. 305, known as the Horse Transportation Safety Act, would ban the use of double decked trailers for all horse transport. H.R. 305 passes House Committee by voice vote.
July 2010 Canada – EU Jul 31: The European Union (EU), FDA and CFIA mandatory regulations go into effect. Makes it illegal to slaughter horses for human consumption who have ever received prohibited substances producing toxins in horse meat.
August 2010 California Aug 2: Bill SJR 22 is amended in assembly. This measure would memorialize the Congress to support federal legislation to protect American horses from slaughter for human consumption. Adopted in the Senate on Aug 25.
October 2010 Office of Inspector General, USDA OIG releases audit revealing that USDA and APHIS have created substantial risk of injury to the public and caused significant injury, suffering and death to horses from failure to enforce standards for conveyance of horses to slaughter pursuant to 9 C.F.R. 88.3 and 88.4. OIG advises several recommendations but no formal action taken.
December 2010 111th Congress 2nd Session Federal legislation to ban horse slaughter, H.R. 503 / S 727, fail due to lack of promotion. H.R. 503 had 190 co-sponsors; S 727 had 28 co-sponsors. H.R. 503 /S. 727 languish and die in committee from neglect.

Compiled by Jane Allin

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See also 2009 Legislative Timeline »

Horse Slaughter Legislative Timeline 2008

State and Federal Legislation
110th U.S. Congress (2007—2008)

DATE VENUE ACTIVITY RESULT
January 2008 South Dakota Several state senators introduce bill S.B. 170 in the South Dakota legislature that would make a state-funded loan of up to $1 million available to anyone wishing to construct and open a horse slaughtering facility in the state. S.B. 170 scheduled for a hearing in the Senate Agriculture and Natural Resources Committee Jan 29, 2008.
January 2008 New Jersey Jan 18: A551, prohibiting slaughter of horses and sale of horseflesh for human consumption, is introduced by Robert S. Dancer. Referred to Assembly Agriculture and Natural Resources Committee. Unsuccessful. Bill dies in Committee.
January 2008 South Dakota Jan 29: S.B. 170, a plan to use public funds to build a horse slaughtering facility in South Dakota is killed in Committee. Unsuccessful. An effort was made to change the language of the bill to say “horse processing” instead of slaughter, but was abortive.
July 2008 110th Congress 2nd Session Jul 24: HR 6598 – PREVENTION OF EQUINE CRUELTY ACT OF 2008 introduced by US Rep John Conyers. See Thomas.gov. Amends Title 18 of the United States Code prohibiting horse slaughter for human consumption as a form of equine cruelty. This would make it a federal offense to sell a horse for slaughter.
Jul 2008 110th Congress 2nd Session July 24: HR 6598 referred to the House Committee on the Judiciary. Bill HR 6598 progresses.
July 2008 110th Congress 2nd Session July 25: HR 6598 referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, and Homeland Security. Bill HR 6598 progresses.
September 2008 110th Congress 2nd Session Sept 23: HR 6598 discharged from Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, and Homeland Security. Judiciary Committee Consideration and Mark-up Session Held. Ordered to be Reported (Amended) by Voice Vote. Bill HR 6598 progresses.
September 2008 110th Congress 2nd Session Sept 23: HR 6598 passes out of the House Judiciary Committee by voice vote after majority reject multiple poison pill amendments. Bill HR 6598 moves successfully out of Cmte. However, see next entry.
September 2008 110th Congress 2nd Session Sept 28: HR 6598 referred sequentially to the House Committee on Agriculture for a period ending not later than Sept 29, 2008 for consideration of such provisions of the bill and amendment as fall within the jurisdiction of that committee pursuant to clause 1(a), rule X. House Ag Cmte gains control of HR 6598.
September 2008 110th Congress 2nd Session Sept 29: House Committee on Agriculture granted an extension for further consideration of HR 6598 ending not later than Oct 2, 2008. HR 6598 must now pass out of the Ag Cmte to be eligible for House vote. Cmte has no intention of hearing this bill. Delaying tactic.
October 2008 110th Congress 2nd Session Oct 2: House Committee on Agriculture granted an extension for further consideration of HR 6598 ending not later than Oct. 3, 2008. House Ag Cmte continues delaying tactic to kill HR 6598.
October 2008 110th Congress 2nd Session Oct 3: House Committee on Agriculture granted an extension for further consideration of HR 6598 ending not later than Jan. 3, 2009. House Ag Cmte succeeds in bottling HR 6598 up in their committee until the 110th Session is over at the end of the year.
December 2008 Wyoming Dec 11-13: A resolution called the Horse Industry Policy, is submitted by Wyoming State Rep. Sue Wallis, and former South Dakota State Rep. Dave Sigdestad, to the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) Agriculture and Energy Committee. Resolution eventually passes.
December 2008 110th Congress 2nd Session HR 6598 is not heard or voted on, so does not pass out of the House Ag Cmte. HR 6598 – PREVENTION OF EQUINE CRUELTY ACT OF 2008 “dies” in Cmte. The Bill had 124 co-sponsors.
December 2008 110th Congress, 2nd Session All Sessions concluded, the 110th Congress adjourns. All legislation left pending is dead, and no work carries forward. Bills must be re-introduced and started afresh.

Compiled by Jane Allin

©The Horse Fund 2019 Logo in Orange.

Horse Slaughter Legislative Timeline 2009

State and Federal Legislation
111th U.S. Congress (2009—2010)

DATE VENUE ACTIVITY RESULT
January 2009 111th Congress 1st Session Jan 14: Rep. John Conyers re-introduces his bill from the 110th Congress, this time under familiar horse slaughter bill number, H.R. 503. Called the “Prevention of Equine Cruelty Act,” it aims to end the export of horses for slaughter in Mexico and Canada. Referred to the Judiciary Committee. Expected to move quickly through the House. See Thomas.gov for further information.
January 2009 New York Assemblywoman Deborah Glick re-introduces bill banning horse slaughter for human consumption, A3736. Referred to Agriculture Cmte. A3736 stalled and finally died in the Agricultural Committee, held up there AGAIN by its pro-slaughter Chairman, William MaGee, a “meat-industry” politician. See “Magee too Cozy with New York Farm Bureau
January 2009 Minnesota Jan 22: SF 133 is introduced urging Congress to oppose federal legislation that interferes with a state’s ability to direct the transport or processing of horses. Referred to Agriculture and Veterans Cmte.
January 2009 Arizona Jan 29: First reading of S.C.M. 1001 urging US Congress to oppose federal legislation that interferes with a state’s ability to direct the transport or processing of horses. Bill advances.
February 2009 North Dakota Feb 06: A legislative committee unanimously approves a state study of a horse slaughter plant in North Dakota due to the “Unwanted Horse” dilemma. Study delays planned legislation to approve opening horse slaughter plant.
February 2009 Utah Feb 12: H.J.R. 7, a nonbinding resolution to allow the transport of horses to Mexico or Canada for slaughter passes the Utah Senate. Vote 19-8 in favor.
February 2009 Tennessee Feb 12: H.B. 1428 a pro-slaughter bill sponsored by Frank Niceley is filed in the Tennessee legislature. New bill at the State level to return horse slaughter to US soil.
February 2009 South Dakota Feb 03/05: S.C.R. 2 resolution opposing H.R. 503 passes full Senate on 02/05 and full House on 05/05 S. Dakota joins other states opposing federal bill H.R. 503.
February 2009 Utah Feb 12: H.J.R. 7 resolution opposing H.R. 503 passes full Senate. Utah joins other states opposing federal bill H.R. 503. Sent to Lieutenant Governor for approval.
February 2009 North Dakota Feb 17: S.C.R. 4021 resolution opposing H.R. 503 passes full Senate and is referred to House Agriculture Committee. Schedules hearing for March 5, 2009. N. Dakota joins other states opposing federal bill H.R. 503.
February 2009 Kansas Feb 17: H.C.R 5004, a Concurrent Resolution by Agriculture and Natural Resources urging Congress to oppose federal legislation interfering with a state’s ability to direct the transport or processing of horses to be adopted. Kansas joins other states opposing federal bill H.R. 503.
February 2009 Illinois Feb 24: The Illinois House agriculture committee approves legislation to overturn H.B. 1711, banning horse slaughter, aimed at the time to shut down the U.S.’s only horse slaughtering plant, Cavel International, in DeKalb. Voted 11-2 in favor. Bill advances.
February 2009 Wyoming Feb 26: H.J.R. opposing H.R. 503 passes full Senate. Signed by Governor on March 03, 2009. Wyoming joins other states opposing federal bill H.R. 503.
March 2009 Wyoming Mar 3: H.J.R. 8 sponsored by Rep. Sue Wallis is signed by the Governor of Wyoming. H.J.R 8 urges Congress to oppose federal legislation that interferes with a state’s ability to direct the transport or processing of horses. Vote 25-5 in favor.
March 2009 Idaho March 9: The Idaho House State Affairs Committee agrees to debate a resolution urging Congress to oppose bill H.R. 503 that would prohibit states’ ability to direct the transport or processing of horses. Idaho joins other states opposing federal bill H.R. 503.
March 2009 Minnesota Mar 11: H.F. 797/S.F. 755 is a bill that if becomes law, would define horses as livestock and raising, breeding, training and boarding horses as agricultural activities. The bills also say horses can be used for their meat, hides and by-products. Referred by Chair to Agriculture, Rural Economies and Veteran Affairs Finance Division.
March 2009 New York Mar 12: A3736/S 3178 prohibiting the slaughter of horses for human consumption is referred by the senate to Consumer Protection. State bill banning horse slaughter introduced in New York.
March 2009 111th Congress 1st Session Mar 16: H.R. 503, Prevention of Equine Cruelty Act is referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, and Homeland Security. Bill advances.
March 2009 Idaho Mar 24: Bill H.J.M 0005, encouraging the president and Congress to remove the prohibition of horse slaughter in order for these animals to be humanely handled is introduced to the Senate and first reading to Agricultural affairs State bill returning horse slaugher to U.S. soil introduced in Idaho.
March 2009 Montana March 19: The Montana State Senate narrowly passes bill HB 418 that would make it easier for a person to start a horse slaughter or processing facility in the state. Vote 27-23 in favor.
March 2009 111th Congress 1st Session March 26: S. 727. Senators Landreiu and Ensign introduce companion bill to H.R. 503 ban horse slaughter in the United States Senate, called the Landrieu-Ensign “Prevention of Equine Cruelty Act”. Companion bill to H.R. 503 introduced.
April 2009 Illinois Apr 01: Illinois House rejects a push to overturn the state’s ban on slaughtering horses for meat (H.B. 1711). Measure was failing 50-67 when the sponsor halted the vote.
April 2009 Arkansas Apr 02; H.C.R. 1004 in support of horse processing facilities passes the House, read twice by Senate, is correctly enrolled and ordered transmitted to the Governor’s office. State bill returning horse slaugher to U.S. soil passes House and Senate in Arkansas.
April 2009 Illinois Apr 03: H.B. 583, sponsored by Rep. Jim Sacia repealing the 2007 state law banning horse slaughter, is re-referred to the Rules Committee Bill advances.
April 2009 Montana April 03; Democratic Gov. Brian Schweitzer’s amendment vetos Bill H.B. 418’s two key provisions for discouraging lawsuits. This measure would give the horse slaughter industry special protections and eliminate citizens’ right to appeal projects over environmental concerns. The sponsor vows to challenge the amendments.
April 2009 North Dakota North Dakota lawmakers have agreed to approve Bill H.B. 1496. $50,000 to be spent on a study of whether a horse slaughterhouse can be built in the state. Vote 86-5 in favor.
April 2009 Montana April 15: The Montana Legislature rejects the governor’s amendments to bill H.B. 418 and returned it to him unchanged. Senate is 44-5 in favor of rejecting the bill. Schweitzer has 10 days to sign or veto the measure. If he does neither, it automatically becomes law. See below.
May 2009 Montana May 01: Bill H.B. 418 to allow investor-owned horse slaughterhouses in Montana, and limit legal action against them, becomes law. Gov. Brian Schweitzer allows it to lapse into law by taking no action Bill becomes law.
May 2009 Missouri May 05: S.C.R 8, sponsored by Wes Shoemyer, is adopted by the House. This bill urges U.S. Congress to support the continuation of horse processing in the United States, offer incentives to help create horse processing plants throughout the country, and oppose any legislation introduced in the new session of Congress that would restrict horse processing. Missouri joins other states opposing federal bill H.R. 503.
May 2009 Tennessee May 05: H.B. 1428/S.B 1898 deferred in Agricultural Committee to May 12, 2009 No advancement.
July 2009 111th Congress 1st Session Jul 17: H.R. 1018, Restore Our American Mustangs Act (ROAM Act) passes in the House. Amends the Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act to revise provisions concerning their management. Vote 239-185 in favor. See Roll Call for vote results. Received in the Senate and referred to the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources (July 20th).
July 2009 Oregon Ranchers, Native Americans and others push for the renewed slaughter of horses in the U.S. — possibly starting in Oregon. Inconclusive.
October 2009 Montana Ed Butcher, sponsor of H.B. 418 in Montana that promotes construction of a horse slaughter plant, courts Chinese investors after European firms show a lack of interest in the venture. Inconclusive.
November 2009 111th Congress 1st Session Two years after the last U.S. horse slaughter plant ceased operations, the Federal Government moves to review what impact the closures of horse slaughter plants have had on horse welfare. Congress requests the GAO to study the issue and report its findings by March 1, 2010.
December 2009 111th Congress 1st Session 1st Session adjourns. Congress reconvenes in January to start the 2nd Session. Pending legislation carries forward.

Compiled by Jane Allin

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