Top 10 countries ranked by horses slaughtered and horse meat production (2018)

March 2020

By JANE ALLIN

MARCH AGAINST HORSE SLAUGHTER — Recall from my introductory article in this series that the FAO stats are not always based on original datasets for countries included in their assessments. Missing values are a common problem for international datasets, stemming form countries’ non-responses to the data requests dispatched on a regular basis by international or regional organizations. The FAO Statistics Division has developed innovative methods to improve data reliability and consistency across statistical domains.

As a result, some numbers may not reflect those you see elsewhere, but nonetheless provide a framework for the overall distribution of horse meat production and horse slaughter across the globe. 

One glaring inconsistency is their failure to recognise that horse slaughter has been effectively shuttered in the US since 2007 and has since shifted to Mexico and Canada. For practical purposes, these data have been omitted from this analysis. Consequently, the numbers for Canada and Mexico will likely differ from actual numbers recorded by the respective countries since both were calculated using imputation methodology. 

Also note that these stats include horses slaughtered, and horse meat from all sources, not just Federal slaughterhouses where meat has been cleared (unscrupulously, of course) for human consumption. Please refer to the FAO website for more information on the collection of data and methods used to report it.

See http://fenixservices.fao.org/faostat/static/documents/Q/Q_Revision_Note_e.pdf

Horses Slaughtered (2018)

China tops the list of countries with the greatest number of horses slaughtered in 2018 (1,589,164 head) representing approximately 32% of the total globally.

The top 10 horse slaughterers by country in the world include about 86% (~ 5 million head) of the world’s total as shown in Table 1 and the accompanying bar chart (Figure 1).

Table 1. Top ten countries for horse slaughter and percent of total globally (2018)

(*) Aggregate, may include official, semi-official, estimated or calculated data

(**) Imputation replaces missing data with substituted values using an appropriate imputation methodology. As a result, it may not precisely reflect official data. http://www.fao.org/fileadmin/user_upload/eufao-fsi4dm/doc-training/17_Hoffmeister__Imputations__EN.pdf

See also to the earlier article: “Horse slaughter and horse meat production worldwide — Introduction

Figure 1. Top ten countries for horse slaughter and percent of total globally (2018)

Horse Meat Production (2018)

Again, China comes in number 1 with the largest amount of horse meat produced (200,452 tonnes or 441,996,660 lb.) representing approximately 26% of the total globally.

The top 10 horse meat producers by country in the world include about 83% of the world’s total representative of 762,713 tonnes (~1.7 billion lb.) as shown in Table 2 and the accompanying bar chart (Figure 2).

Table 2. Top ten countries for horse meat production and percent of total globally (2018)

Figure 2. Top ten countries for horse meat production and percent of total globally (2018)

How have things changed since 2013?

The last time we looked at these numbers was 2017 when the most recent data available was from 2013. Currently the most recent metrics are from 2018. To demonstrate how things evolved over the 5-year interval, a comparison of data between 2013 and 2018 was evaluated.

• The % change in horses slaughtered for the top ten horse slaughtering countries globally from 2013 to 2o18.

• The % change in horse meat production for the top ten horse meat producing countries globally from 2013 to 2o18.

Table 3. Top ten countries for horse slaughter and percent of total globally: 2018 vs 2013

Figure 3. % change in horses slaughtered from 2013 to 2018 – Top ten countries

For the top ten countries for horse slaughter, the total number of horses slaughtered increased by about 31% in 2018 compared to 2013 (i.e. 1,173,714 head). The most notable increases were for Kazakhstan (37%), Mongolia (33%), and Kyrgystan (21%). Moderate increases were observed for China and Brazil (6.5) while the other countries had less than a 5% increase, with decreases observed in both Australia (-12%) and Russia (~4%). 

Table 4. Top ten countries for horse meat production and percent of total globally: 2018 vs 2013

Figure 4. % change in horse meat production from 2013 to 2018 – Top ten countries

For the top ten countries for horse meat production, the total tonnes of horse meat produced increased by about 15% in 2018 compared to 2013 (i.e. 85,223 tonnes or approximately 188 million lb.). The most notable increases were for Mongolia (~95%), almost double what they produced in 2013, and Kazakhstan (41.5%). Moderate increases were observed for China (~12%), Kyrgystan (9%) and Brazil (~7%), while the other countries had less than a 5% increase, with decreases observed in both Australia (-12%) and Russia (~7%). 

SUMMARY

(1) China tops the list of countries with the greatest number of horses slaughtered in 2018 (1,589,164 head) representing approximately 32% of the total globally.

(2) The top 10 global horse slaughterers by country include about 86% (~ 5 million head) of the world’s total.

(3) China also comes in number 1 with the largest amount of horse meat produced (200,452 tonnes or 441,996,660 lb.) representing approximately 26% of the total globally.

(4) The top 10 horse global meat producers by country include about 83% of the world’s total representative of 762,713 tonnes (~1.7 billion lb.).

(5) Little has changed from 2013 to 2018 in terms of the ranking of the top ten countries for both horse slaughter and horse meat production. China remains the leading nation for both metrics. 

(6) However, there have been significant changes for several countries as far as the increases or decreases observed for both metrics.

(7) For horse slaughter, the most notable increases between 2013 and 2018 were for Kazakhstan (37%), Mongolia (33%), and Kyrgystan (21%). Moderate increases were observed for China and Brazil (6.5) while decreases were observed for both Australia (-12%) and Russia (~4%). 

(8) For horse meat production, the most significant increases were observed for Mongolia (~95%), almost double what they produced in 2013, and Kazakhstan (41.5%). Moderate increases were observed for China (~12%), Kyrgystan (9%) and Brazil (~7%), while decreases observed in both Australia (-12%) and Russia (~7%). 

(9) For the top ten countries, the total number of horses slaughtered increased by about 31% in 2018 compared to 2013 (i.e. 1,173,714 head). This increase is due to the large increases observed in Kazakhstan, Mongolia and Kyrgystan along with the moderate increase in China. 

(10) The total tonnes of horse meat produced for the top ten producing nations increased by about 15% (i.e. 85,223 tonnes or approximately 188 million lb.). This increase is primarily a result of the increased horse meat production in Mongolia, Kazakhstan and China. 


All Reports

Horse slaughter and horse meat production worldwide — Introduction »

Horse slaughter and horse meat production — A global perspective »

Top 10 countries ranked by horses slaughtered and horse meat production — 2018 »

Top 10 importers and exporters of horse meat worldwide »

Canada’s Horse Slaughter Plants and U.S. Ports of Entry »


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AVMA — Horse slaughter exports to Mexico decrease

Published on February 26, 2020

Last year, 53,947 horses were shipped from the United States to Mexico for slaughter. That marks a 26% decrease from 2018 when 70,708 horses designated for slaughter were transported across the southern U.S. border, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Market News Livestock Export Summary.

Although Congress had made several attempts to ban the slaughter of horses for human consumption, the practice didn’t end until the nation’s three horse meat processing plants closed in 2007. Two Texas facilities were closed by court order; the Illinois plant shuttered after state legislation against horse slaughter was enacted.

Efforts to open new horse slaughter plants have been unsuccessful, partly because of legislation denying funds for federal inspections of such operations.

Nevertheless, thousands of U.S. horses have been exported to slaughterhouses in Mexico and Canada.

Canada and Mexico are two of the main exporters of horse meat to Europe, according to Humane Society International. At least 85% of horses slaughtered at European Union–approved Canadian horse slaughterhouses originated in the United States, and 50% of the horse meat produced from those animals was exported to the EU.

Federal data on the number of horses transported to Canada annually aren’t available. However, the advocacy organization Animals’ Angels estimated that 12,273 U.S. horses were imported by Canada for slaughter in 2017.

California, Illinois, New Jersey, Texas, and New York have enacted laws against horse slaughter and eating horse meat.

Related Reading

US horse slaughter exports to Mexico increase 312%“, JAVMA NEWS, 14 Jan 2008

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Horse Slaughter Canada

Four slaughterhouses are federally licensed to slaughter horses in Canada:

• Bouvry Export Calgary Ltd. in Fort MacLeod, Alta. See  https://www.bouvrycanada.ca/ 

• Canadian Premium Meats Inc. in Lacombe, Alta. See http://www.cpmeats.com/

• Les Viandes de la Petite-Nation in St-Andre- Avellin, Que.; [517 Rang Sainte Julie E, Saint-André-Avellin, QC J0V 1W0]. No website.

• Viande Richelieu Inc. in Massueville, Que. See https://www.vianderichelieu.com/ 

Export Corridors for US Slaughterbound Horses to Canada

More importantly, here are the only designated ports of entry for slaughter-bound horses:

Canadian Port of Entry:Corresponding US Port of Entry
Kingsgate, British Columbia
250-417-2293
Eastport, Idaho
208-267-2396
Coutts, Alberta
403-344-3808
Sweetgrass, Montana
406-335-9610
North Portal, Saskatchewan
306-927-2255
Portal, North Dakota
701-926-4281
Sarnia (Point Edward), Ontario
519-332-3031
Port Huron, Michigan
517-324-5298
Windsor, Ontario
519-969-2522
Detroit, Michigan
313-226-4428
Niagara Falls (Queenston), Ontario
905-937-7434
Lewiston, New York
716-297-6203
Saint-Bernard-de-Lacolle, Quebec
450-246-4125
Champlain, New York
518-298-2191
Woodstock, New Brunswick
506-325-1960
Houlton, Maine
207-532-6099
Source: https://www.inspection.gc.ca/animal-health/humane-transport/horses/designated-border-ports/eng/1324090361423/1324310392596
Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Compiled by JANE ALLIN | January 2020

Featured Image: Slaughterbound horse in Cleburne, Texas. By Michael Mulvey, USA Today Sports.


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Horse Tripping — States Where It’s Illegal

Horse tripping originated in Mexican rodeos called charreadas. Some American have taken a liking to it and added this gruesome and deadly spectacle to its horror shows.

In alphabetical order with links to laws and statutes.

Arizona
AZ Rev § 13-2910.09
http://goo.gl/4QnshU;
See also http://goo.gl/FB0OpN at 5.

California
CA Penal Code § 597g
http://goo.gl/Eg0Fj7

Florida
FL Statute § 828.1
http://goo.gl/nkpzxX

Illinois
510 ILCS 70/5.01
http://goo.gl/yOWvxr;
See also http://goo.gl/fFt3KE

Kansas
KS ST Art. 64 § 21-6142 (4)
http://goo.gl/9dSGys

Maine
7 MRS § 3972.1.F
http://goo.gl/chGRgr

Nebraska
NRS § 54-911
http://goo.gl/gqFJne

Nevada
NRS 574.100 § 5(a), 5(b) and NRS 244.359
http://goo.gl/ru3KUy and http://goo.gl/rzXBAF

New Mexico
NM State Statute § 30-18-11
http://goo.gl/gKPFgu; See also http://goo.gl/szIX3q

Oklahoma
OK State Statute 21 § 1700
http://wp.me/a6VVi-9cv pdf

Oregon (Effective Jan. 1, 2014)
OR 167.383
http://wp.me/a6VVi-9cw pdf

Rhode Island
RI General Laws § 4-20-4
http://goo.gl/8FdFNB

Texas
TX Penal Code, Title 9, Chapter 42 – § 42.09
(a)( 8); (c)( 6); and (f)
http://goo.gl/97qYff

States Needing a Law Against Horse Tripping

Colorado
Utah
Washington
Wyoming

Pending Laws

• Utah Update — House Bill 261 fails. See Deseret News » See also “Lawmakers back off horse-tripping ban” at KSL.com »

• Virginia — Anti Horse Tripping law poised to pass in Virginia; awaiting Governor’s signature. See NY Times »

Can We Get a Witness?

If you witness horse tripping or other rodeo cruelties please let us know. Contact us in complete confidence that we will protect your identity. Photos and video recordings would also be most welcome.


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Last Updated 16 Nov 19

Where will Wyeth’s horses go?

Pharmaceutical giant Wyeth puts thousands of horses at risk of slaughter with announcement of massive PMU farm closures

Wyeth logo. Google image.

Houston, Texas (Apr. 27, 2005) – Wyeth Pharmaceuticals sounds a death knell for thousands of horses with its recent announcement that it is significantly reducing production of its hormone replacement therapy drugs for women made from pregnant mare’s urine.

Wyeth just announced its closure of 19 pregnant mare urine farms in Alberta, Canada and approximately 30 more ranches in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and North Dakota. This will displace around 30,000 mares altogether, almost all of which are pregnant.

During the last layoff due to the downsizing of the industry due to rapidly declining demand for Wyeth’s Premarin® family of drugs, nearly 15,000 horses were put “out of work.” Although some were bought or found homes, a high percentage of the mares and foals went to slaughter.

In the United States, much is being made about the so-called “unwanted horse” in reaction to pending legislation in Congress that would ban horse slaughter. This culminated in a summit meeting recently hosted in Washington DC by the American Association of Equine Practitioners to discuss what should be done with America’s surplus horses.

Pharmaceutical giant Wyeth, who has earned billions of dollars since the 1950s from the sale of its Premarin® family of drugs made from pregnant mare’s urine, is once again burdening the equine communities in both the U.S. and Canada with thousands of its redundant horses. However, the Unwanted Horse Summit did not address the problem of the thousands of horses unwanted by Wyeth.

“It would be highly beneficial if the AAEP would place issues like the sudden dumping of thousands of horses no longer wanted by Wyeth on the Summit meeting’s agenda,” comments Vivian Farrell, President of the Int’l Fund for Horses. “Failing to address situations like these takes away credibility from these sorts of proceedings.”

Where will Wyeth’s unwanted horses go?

As in the past, it will be publicly supported horse rescues and shelters who will have to intervene if the majority of these horses are not to end up in the horse slaughter plants of the U.S. and Canada, and subsequently on someone’s dinner plate in Europe and Japan.

“We are calling on Wyeth to come up with a workable plan and the capital to provide for the care and maintenance of its mares and foals until appropriate homes are found for them,” states Sinikka Crosland, Executive Director of the Canadian Horse Defence Coalition. “It is high time Wyeth took real responsibility for theses horses and provided the much needed support to those of us willing to do this work.”


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